Accreditations

FAQ

Here you will find an ever changing and updated list of Frequently Asked Questions for both our Environmental Services section of Envirocare and our Occupational Hygiene and Safety Services section.

You can navigate to each specific answer via the links below.

Of course we’d prefer it if you called us on 01274 738668 or filled out our Envirocare Enquiry Form for any specific questions regarding our many services that aren’t listed below.


Environmental Services – Frequently Asked Questions

“What is MCERTS”
“What are the Environmental Permitting Regulations (2010)?”
“Who regulates my installation?”
“Does my activity need to be regulated?”
“Do I need to inform my regulator of a proposed monitoring exercise?”
“What do I need to do ahead of my monitoring exercise?”
“Will I be able to get my results prior to contractors leaving site?”
“How long will it all take?”
“How is testing actually undertaken?”
“Can you sample from the outlet of a stack?”


Occupational Hygiene & Safety Services – Frequently Asked Questions

Who needs hearing (Audiometry) tests?
Why would I need to have lung function tests (Spirometry) for my employees?
What should we do with the results of the workplace air monitoring that we carry out?
Do our management and visitors have to wear hearing protection when they go into a Hearing Protection Zone (HPZ) even if only for a few minutes?”
Is it ok to remove hearing protection for just a short time in a Hearing Protection zone (HPZ)?


Environmental Services

“What is MCERTS?”

MCERTS is the Environment Agency’s Monitoring Certification Scheme. It provides the framework for businesses to meet strict quality requirements. If you comply with MCERTS, the regulator can have confidence in the monitoring of emissions to the environment.

“What are the Environmental Permitting Regulations (2010)?”

The Environmental Permitting Regulations (England and Wales) 2010 were introduced on 6 April 2010, replacing the 2007 Regulations. In 2007 the Regulations combined the Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) and Waste Management Licensing (WML) regulations. Their scope has since been widened to include water discharge and groundwater activities, radioactive substances and provision for a number of Directives, including the Mining Waste Directive.

“Who regulates my installation?”

If you operate a Part B or Part A2 Permit under the Environmental Permitting Regulations (2010), you are regulated by your Local Authority. If you operate a Part A1 Process within the same regulations, you are regulated by the Environment Agency.

“Does my activity need to be regulated?”

To definitively answer that question, first of all we need to consult the regulations. Schedule 1 of EPR (2010) lists just about every industrial activity that you can think of. Applied to each activity is a threshold or series of thresholds that dictate if and how the activity needs to be regulated. It must be stressed that if you believe that your activity falls within the remit of the EPR (2010) you have a duty to inform the potential regulating authority. The regulating authority will then inform you of your legal obligations. We would be happy to help you with your enquiries and interpretation of the legislation.

“Do I need to inform my regulator of a proposed monitoring exercise?”

If you operate a Part B or Part A2 Permit, you are required to inform the regulating Local Authority at least seven days prior to the proposed monitoring start date.

“What do I need to do ahead of my monitoring exercise?”

  • Inform the regulator (if applicable).
  • Ahead of any monitoring exercise, a contractor will require you to ensure that sufficient production is available for the processes to be monitored. Remember, unlike most contractors, we need your processes running!
  • It is also essential ensure that safe and suitable access to the monitoring position(s) is provided. In some instances, no extra work is required; where access is from ground level, on top of a machine, permanent platform erected etc. In other instances, temporary scaffold or mobile plant may need to be arranged.
  • It is also advisable to have a plant engineer on stand-by should amendments to the process need to be made on account of the emissions measured. We would advise.

“Will I be able to get my results prior to contractors leaving site?”

Officially no, although for some tests, we may be able to provide you with an unofficial indication of results. Where a monitoring test requires a subsequent analytical stage in an approved laboratory, we will not be able to indicate the result to you. Where a test provides a real-time read-out we may be able to indicate an unofficial result. In either instance, the figures that we generate always require correcting for several parameters. This is done using our electronic templates back at base. As such, any indication provided on-site should not be considered to be the official result or indeed 100% accurate at that time.

“How long will it all take?”

This is dependent upon a large number of factors including the number of emission points, the number and duration of the tests required and any local site factors such as induction procedures and Permits to Work. We promise to report all results within three weeks of completion of the monitoring exercise, although often it is much faster than this. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us in advance. We will be happy to discuss your requirement and provide you with an estimated duration.

“How is testing actually undertaken?”

This can vary quite considerably based upon the monitoring standards employed and the pollutants that require quantifying. Essentially, all test methods follow the procedure of extracting a sample of gas from the stack, at a suitable sampling location. It is essential that a representative sample of gas is taken for collection and analysis. Some test methods involve simultaneous collection and analysis stages, for example non-dispersive infra-red analysis of carbon monoxide. Other test methods involve separate collection and analysis methods, for example trapping particulate matter on a filter which is subsequently weigh gravimetrically in a laboratory.

“Can you sample from the outlet of a stack?”

No. It is essential that a representative sample gas is collected. External factors, such as ambient currents and temperature variations can disrupt the process air at the point of efflux. It is normally not suitable to take a sample of gas from less than 5 duct diameters distance from the outlet of the stack.

Occupational Hygiene & Safety Services

“Who needs hearing (Audiometry) tests?”

Employers need to provide health surveillance for all workers regularly exposed to noise at or above 85dB(A). This is specified in regulation 9 of the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 (Noise Regulations 2005). Susceptible workers exposed to 80dB(A) or more on a regular occurrence should also be tested as part of the health surveillance.

“Why would I need to have lung function tests (Spirometry) for my employees?”

Employees who are likely to be exposed to respiratory sensitisers should be provided with suitable health surveillance. The exact details will depend of the nature and likelihood of exposure. Envirocare will be able to provide you testing and advice to ensure that health surveillance fits your particular circumstances. Substances requiring spirometry testing include isocyanates, wood dust and flour dust. These tests are required to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH).

“What should we do with the results of the workplace air monitoring that we carry out?”

  • Read the report fully.
  • Communicate the results and action that is planned to the staff.
  • Use the results to review and incorporate them into the risk assessment.

“Do our management and visitors have to wear hearing protection when they go into a Hearing Protection Zone (HPZ) even if only for a few minutes ?”

Yes, a HPZ is mandatory all of the time when in the area.

“Is it ok to remove hearing protection for just a short time in a Hearing Protection zone (HPZ)?”

No, a HPZ is mandatory all of the time. Just removing protection for a short time, i.e. just a couple of minutes radically lowers their effectiveness for the full shift.

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Visit:
Envirocare Consultancy
St. Blaise House
Vaughan Street
Bradford
West Yorkshire
BD1 2LL

We also have offices in Hull and Liverpool